State of Working Wisconsin - 2014

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August 30, 2014

Download State of Working Wisconsin 'By the Numbers'

 

The State of Working Wisconsin 2014 uses the best and recent data available on jobs and wages to describe the serious economic challenges that Wisconsin continues to face:

 

A Significant Wisconsin Jobs Deficit

Wisconsin needs 130,400 jobs today to get back to the 2007 level of employment, taking into account the shortfall (WI jobs still 21,900 below 2007), plus jobs needed to accommodate population growth since then (108,500).

 

Slower than National Job Growth

Over the course of the recovery, Wisconsin lagged behind the national job growth rate (4.0 v. 6.1%). That means every time national growth should have given Wisconsin three jobs, the state added just two. WI would have 58,000 more jobs today if state jobs had grown at the national rate.

 

Wisconsin’s Severe Racial Inequality

Wisconsin African American unemployment (15 percent) is 2.8 times higher than Wisconsin’s white unemployment rate (5.4 percent). Only three states (MN, NE, and LA) and Washington DC posted higher levels of black/white disparity.


Long- Term Stagnation of the Median Wage

The annual hourly real wage increase for the median worker (1979-2013). Taking inflation into account, the median wage grew by just 50¢ from $16.50 in 1979 to $17.00 per hour in 2013. (Wages expressed in 2013 $s.) The median wage has ticked up in the last few years but remains below the pre-recssion high.

 

Gender Gap Closing (Slowly)

The gender gap has narrowed in the last few decades. In 1979, at the median, for every dollar a man earned, women earned 59 cents. By 2013, women earned 82 cents. The shrinking gap is the result of an increase in women’s wages and declining wages for men (with those declines concentrated in the 1980s and early 90s).

 

Continued Decline of  Defining Sector

Manufacturing employment has fallen from 600,000 in 2000 to 466,000 in 2014 leaving fewer than four workers employed in manufacturing today for every five employed in 2000. It is true that manufacturing has produced jobs in the recovery, but not at rates that will get us back to levels of the past. And despite these losses, Wisconsin remains consistently among the top of states in terms of manufacturing employment.

 

Act 10 Aftermath

Given the structure of Act 10, it is no surprise that Wisconsin’s public sector unionization rate is falling. The state’s public sector unionization rate has fallen from over 50 percent, to 35 percent. The decline in Dane County is much more dramatic with public sector unionzation falling in half over just one year, from 55 percent in 2011 to 26 percent in 2012. 

 

Previous State of Working Wisconsin Reports Here>